From the Editor’s Desk: Gravity Theory | Columns | burnettcountysentinel.com – Burnett County Sentinel

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Cartoons can defy gravity. But should they? Should children be taught that if you run off a cliff, miles above the desert, you don’t REALLY fall until you look down and realize it? Is this the kind of world we want our children to grow up in, where the Lamestream Media taught ‘em that gravity is optional? Exactly. Sure, to some folks, this sounds crazy - which it is - but to some, it’s totally reasonable, and cartoon gravity is a real threat to our children that needs to be addressed ASAP by local school boards, the FCC, legislatures, Congress and probably the Supreme High Council – you know, those little Swiss bankers who really make the rules.  Yes, tinfoil isn’t just for the bottom of that shiny Kenmore anymore.

There is a growing trend by radical, far-right activists to ban certain books, topics, subjects, teachings or even definitions, like CRT (critical race theory), which they can’t explain but KNOW it’s bad, because they heard it was and they’re fighting “wokeness,” which they don’t really know what it means, either, but think it threatens their version of reality, racism, history, sexuality, mathematics, and science. Sadly, gravity has been left out of the effort.While I hoped this gene would be shamed out decades ago, it reminds me of one of the first real efforts to censor media through grassroots governmental ‘review,’ going back almost a century to a weekly Sunday morning AM radio show, hosted by a fundamentalist Southern minister who made the grave error of injecting too much color into his broadcast/sermon. His mistake was to describe their small Bible Belt downtown as being so lonely and quiet, the only customer was a lumbering, old dog that was, well, peeing on the cars - but the Good Reverend described the dog as “Baptizing” them. Ahem.The original recording was lost, but it became a cherished example of “foul-mouthed radio broadcasting,” where religion and freedom crossed swords and was arguably the impetus for Southern support of the 1934 Communications Act – and the first real push for broad censorship of a public service.I even wrote a Haiku about it in college: St. Bernard

A lone Preacher dogSaunters across townBaptizing hubcapsWhile all societies seem to have some flavor of ‘morality police’ activists who try to force their half-baked religious/political rules, these new activists tend to show up in statehouses, Assembly ballots and school board rooms with whole new flavors of crazy propaganda and dog whistling. The Communications Act of 1934 was innovative, but sadly, it also opened the door to everything from media monopolies, expansion, innovation, shared platforms, and mass propaganda to yes, censorship. (I assume that someone is always listening, which is why I only speak to my pets in French Pig Latin.)The Act allowed for future regulation of everything from short and broad-band radio to TVs, mobile phones, satellites, Bluetooth, microwaves, remote control fobs and even baby monitors. It wasn’t until radio became so commonplace that the most ultra-conservative, radical bureaucrats felt the need to step in, and get us all Right with the Lord – and their political platform.Later, many of those persnickety do-gooders forced bizarre media censorship, from TV couples having separate beds (Mary Tyler Moore and Dick VanDyke; Lucy and Ricky), and never being able to kiss without at least one foot on the floor. You know, reality.Their shadow is still haunting prime time TV and movie ratings, where an occasional butt cheek is worse for kids than animal abuse, suicide, multiple murders, or bodily functions.  While we may look the other way as goofball ‘CRT’ examples are used to bring on more censorship, the truth is it’s a troubling slope to fall down, and while it’s refreshing, maybe, that it wasn’t a nekked person, swear words, racism, or violence that advanced the censorship ‘cause’ - It was about a lonely dog and religion. Of course, we still need to worry about that cartoon gravity… especially with so many steep cliffs around here.

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